Womans’ cosmetics and packaging

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Womans’ cosmetics and packaging
(including nail buffers)

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Bible with concealed spine and hollow ceramic figures

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False bottom playing cards and hollow body magnifying glass

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False bottom can and lactometer with concealments

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Pen-case, false base screw lid and torch with concealment

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Hearing aids with battery and hearing piece concealments

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Hearing aids with battery and hearing piece concealments

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Souvenier of italian wall, walnut and rubber biscuit, all with concealments

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Match books and watches housing concealments

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Clothes brush, rouge brush, clothing brushes, all with concealment

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Measuring devices, housing concealments

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Childrens' truck and panda radio, all with concealments

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Container, gasket and camera, all with concealments

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below
Hair and clothing brushes, housing concealments, click image to enlarge
Pens and other staionery housing concealments, click image to enlarge
Syringes and other medical app. housing concealments, click image to enlarge
 
 
 
 
 
 
Original press release:
 
This present exhibition is a return to physical installation and informed more by the techniques of music-making and text hence the use of cut-up. As with conventional cut-up one would butcher a series of texts and combine them at random to form new sentences, phrases and constellation. Here the “cut” is restricted to various source alone, and not applied on a micro level, hence a simple shuffle is made to result in a blunt scenario.
This scenario can best be described as a museum of concealed twigs for the blind.
 
The objects and devices used to conceal the twigs are not tied to an obvious use although they are reminiscent of 70’s spy culture, a by-product of the Cold War. The descriptions notated in Braille are European weather reports; uncipherable chunks of supposed text, lending significance to the accompanying objects more in respect to their quantity than actual comprehension.
   
Part museum, part information booth for the potential uncovering of concealed items, the “museum” appears to function as actual repository, its signage and finishings adding authenticity to its subject. With time the museum reveals its true subject; namely itself. This in turn can be seen as a reflection on the nature of representation and malleability within the mechanics of reason.